Life Coaching for Moms – How a Life Coach Helps Mothers Succeed

Perhaps the best tip for life coaching is to find your target market (moms?) – and love your clients! Here’s how one life coach helps mothers succeed.

This isn’t just an inside look at life coaching for moms – here, you’ll also find career tips for life coaches and the best and worst parts of this type of job.

“Most people are surprised that I am a Life Coach for moms,” says Lori Radun, an experienced life coach, author, speaker, and owner/CEO of Momnificent!®. “They’ve never heard of life coaching for mothers before. I hear everything from ‘Boy, I sure wish you were around when my children were young!’ to ‘Is there something like this for Dads?’ What makes my work unique is that I get to assist my clients in finding their own version of success. It may be a happier marriage for one, a healthy body for another, or expanding their at-home business.”

Doesn’t that sound like a fantastic job? Here, Radun explains what life coaches do — with a special focus on helping busy moms succeed.

Life Coach Job Description

The primary mission of Radun’s life coaching business is “empowering moms to create magnificent lives, personally, professionally and spiritually.”

“However, the other titles I go by are certified life coach, inspirational speaker and author of The Momnificent!® Life – Healthy and Balanced Living for Busy Moms,” she says. “As a life coach for moms, I work with stressed, overwhelmed, or dissatisfied moms that want more from their life than they are currently getting.  I help them identify what is important to them, create an action plan to achieve the goals they desire, and together we work through the obstacles so they can experience the success they deserve as mothers and as women.”

How Much Does a Life Coach for Moms Make?

Professional life coaches can make as little as $20,000 a year to multi-millions,” says Radun. “It really depends on who you are coaching.”

She offers this disclaimer: “To be honest, there are a lot of life coaches calling themselves coaches who are not educated as coaches.  But a certified coach goes through a coach training institution that may or may not be accredited by the International Coach Federation. A certified life coach receives formal coach training that typically lasts anywhere from 6 months to one year.”

Radun has a bachelor degree in Psychology and a certification from iPEC Coaching, which is a coach training school that is fully accredited by the ICF.  She also has coached beyond 750 hours, which makes her eligible for a PCC (Professional Certified Coach) designation from the International Coach Federation.

The Best Part of Life Coaching for Moms

“What I love most about helping mothers succeed is that I am passionate about personal growth, and I get to make a difference in the world demonstrating this,” she says. “There is nothing more fulfilling than that!”

Radun is equally as pleased with being an entrepreneur, because of the flexibility and creativity it allows her. “Momnificent!® is my baby. I get to design and execute products and services that hopefully help today’s moms and future generations build happier, healthier and more positive family lives.”

The Downside of Working as a Life Coach

Radun admits that she chose a tough market to try and sell personal development products and services to, because it requires a mother to value herself enough to invest time, effort and money so that her family can receive the benefits. “I am trying to shift a paradigm that says ‘mom is a good mom when she self sacrifices and puts her needs last.’  It’s a tough sell, at first.”

She’s like many small business owners who struggle with the administrative parts of her job. “As an entrepreneur, I don’t always like doing the business parts of my job,” she says. “But, until you can afford to hire someone to take your place, it just goes with the territory.  I’d much rather be doing what I’m gifted at: life coaching.”

Life Coaching Career Tips

Radun shares a common bond with many who show an interest in working as a life coach: the desire to help people succeed and make a difference in their lives. However, she cautions, “Do not forget that you are running a business and must understand how to start it, to grow and maintain your business while you are coaching people. If you do not have a business background, this can become a huge learning curve.”

She adds that the best way to be a successful life coach (for moms or othewise!) is to choose a target market from the very beginning, rather than coaching anyone who expresses an interest. The narrower your target market, the better.

“Get to know your clients intimately,” says Radun. “Once you know what their problems are, you can become their solution.”

For more tips on starting a successful business, read  What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful – it’s a bestselling book on Amazon.

If you’re curious about different target markets for life coaches, read Want to Be a Business Coach? Get Inside Small Biz Coaching.

Do you have any questions or thoughts on life coaching for moms? Please comment below.

Lori Radun, The Momnificent!® Coach, is a certified life coach, inspirational speaker and author of The Momnificent(TM) Life: Healthy and Balanced Living for Busy Moms. A support to conscious mothers everywhere, Lori’s mission is to help moms raise their energy, raise their morale, and raise their consciousness while raising great kids.  Her website is a place where mothers go to receive expert advice and unconditional support on living magnificent lives.

About the author: Janet Morris Grimes is the author of the book, The Parent’s Guide to Uncluttering Your Home, scheduled to be released on April 30, 2011 through Atlantic Publishing. A wife and mother of three, she currently writes from her home in Canton, Michigan on such topics as faith, family, teen issues, writing, and the fatherless. She launched Abbandoned Ministries in December of 2010, leading others through writing and speaking to seek God, as Abba, during times of abandonment. To contact Janet, visit her website at http://janetmorrisgrimes.com or http://abbandoned.com.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *